THE NEXT BIG THING

Last week Steven Savile tagged me on his blog as part on an ongoing chain of book/author recommendations called The Next Big Thing. Today I will take a crack at the ten questions originated by Paul Magrs, then send them on to five more authors to post answers to them in their various blogs – one week from today.  I will be discussing the latest (and currently in progress) addition to The DeChance Chronicles :

 1.     What is the working title of your next book?

Nevermore – Book V of The DeChance Chronicles

 

2. Where did the idea come from for the book?

The series, obviously, has been in the works for a while.  The idea for this particular story, however, comes from several sources, bits and pieces of things I’ve been wanting to work on but never got around to.  I’ve been playing for a while with the notion that my protagonist, Donovan DeChance, has been alive for a long time, and has witnessed some things – from a very different perspective than the rest of the world – and might tell some of those stories.

While researching the fourth book in the series, Kali’s Tale, I found a couple of interesting sites about a roadhouse that rested on the border of North Carolina and Virginia back in the day.  The laws of both states were different, as were the laws about things like dueling – if one party was on either side of the line.

One of the rumors about the roadhouse, which I call simply the Halfway House, was that Edgar Allen Poe stayed there, and that he wrote the first draft of his poem The Raven while in residence.  Just one of many rumors surrounding that work, but I held onto it.

The sub-plot comes from a practice I share with my youngest daughter – picking out faces, animals, and images in things like trees, floor tiles, stones, bushes – clouds.  I wrote a story a while back titled The Fruit of a Different Vine, involving a pole near our home that grows thick every year with vines until it resembles a woman pointing a gun into the woods over the top of a small home.  In Nevermore, we meet Lenore, who is an artist.  She sees those same types of things, and she draws them, paints them – and tries to set them free.

 

3. What genre does your book fall under?

That’s a good question.  It’s dark fantasy, to be sure, with elements of horror and urban fantasy as well.  This particular book also falls under historical fantasy, I suppose.  Donovan DeChance is a magician, of a sort – a book collector bound on gathering the dangerous books and spells of the world, scanning them into a new computerized repository, and most importantly, sealing them away from the hands of those who would misuse them.  You can read his origin story in the third book of the series, My Soul to Keep,  which has him 16 years old in the mid-1800s.

There are vampires in these books, and dragons, rifts between worlds, werewolves – voodoo houngans and new-ageish crystal-toting witches.

 

4. What actors would you choose to play the part of your characters in a movie rendition?

This is a little hard for me.  The perfect Donovan DeChance would be somewhat of a hybrid.  He’s originally born of the old west, so I can see some Sam Elliott, but Sam is far too old – If you mixed in some Jason Momoa for the swagger and a bit of humor, and some Robert Downey Jr. for the culture it would be close.  I’d love to hear thoughts on this from readers of the series.  Donovan is a lot like Harry Dresden, except, Harry gets beaten up all the time, and seems more “rumpled”.  Donovan wears long dark coats, has long hair in a day when it’s not really fashionable, but pulls it off.

Definitely Felicia Day for Amethyst, his love interest, who is adept at Earth and crystal magic.

For Poe?  Someone tragic.  In this story, both Poe and Lenore would be slightly older…Maybe Amanda Tapping for Lenore, and Grimm’s David Giuntoli as Poe? Is he too young to fall for Tapping?

 

5. What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?

 

Donovan DeChances shares a memory from his past, dragging his companions into the world of Poe’s The Raven, and then bringing that world back to the present – and to the secrets of The Great Dismal Swamp.

 

6. Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

This is an odd question in that a: it only gives a small fraction of the possible answers, and b: I’m in a rather unique position.  I am the founder of Crossroad Press –and since the creation of the company, all of my books have come out as Crossroad Press titles.  In a sense, it is self-published, but Crossroad Press is a growing force in digital, print, and audio publishing.  The only thing certain is – no agents will be involved.

 

7. How long did it take you to write a first draft of the manuscript?

I am writing it now, during Nanowrimo 2012.  I suspect I will finish the full novel by the beginning of December…and I am scheduled to hit the 50,000 word mark (if I retain my rate of speed) around the 23rd of the month as things stand.

 

8. What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?

I’ve made the comparison before to my early work for White Wolf Publishing and their “World of Darkness”.  I originally created Donovan because I wanted to try writing similar stories, but without the restrictions of their game, their world, and their creative vision.  I also believe fans of The Dresden Files, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Grimm, Angel, etc. will find this a perfect match.  Heck, I even named the crow that hangs out with Poe … Grimm.

 

9. Who or what inspired you to write this book?

This seems like a very similar question to the one above asking where the idea for the book came from.  I’ve been inspired to write since I was very young.  I’ve got over 30 books out now, with more in the works – I can’t imagine NOT writing – so it’s not so much what inspired me to write this book – but what inspires me to write.

My family – the way they support my stories, put up with my endless “what ifs” and dig in to help any time I need it.  My co-workers, who have been the first group I’ve worked with in all my days as a writer, with the exception of a few small groups on US Navy ships, who paid attention when I said I was a writer – read the books – and seem genuinely interested.

This book is partly inspired by fans.  There are thousands of folks out there now who have dipped into the world of San Valencez, California, and Donovan DeChance.  I don’t want to disappoint them, or let them down.  The magic continues.

Final nod on this question to my son Bill Macomber.  He went in just before midnight and bumped the poll I was conducing to  choose which of three possible projects I’d complete this November to the DeChance win.  I’m now going to make him read them all.

 

10. What else about the book might pique the reader’s interest?

 

I think the growing dynamics of how “magic” operates in Donovan’s world is fascinating.  The idea that time is more of a static plane one can move across – even influencing events in odd, temporal glitches.  The story of Poe, and Lenore should be of interest to many.  I’d like to think I’ll do him justice, and that my tale will become part of the fictional canon surrounding his life and work.  He’s been a huge inspiration in my own work.

One thing of note – this will be a print book as well as eBook and audio – and we hope to get all of the previous books into print as well, both hardcover and trade paperback.  Heart of a Dragon is already available in trade paperback – we are expanding our print line significantly, and one thing we’d like to see is an attractive, hard cover set for collectors and fans.

All of the eBook editions of The DeChance Chronicles are available from the Crossroad Press Store – or along with my other digital books at Barnes & Noble  – Amazon.com – and most other eBook outlets.

FINAL NOTE:

The five writers I’m going to tag will be: Steven Mark Rainey, Sandra Kasturi, Raymond Benson, Jay Bonansinga, and Bill Crider. They’ll be blogging the same questions in a week’s time.